All types of english alphabets

Alternative ways of writing English This is a collection of constructed scripts and alternative spelling systems all types of english alphabets English. These scripts are all invented by visitors to Omniglot. If you have invented a new alphabet and would like me to add it to this site, please read the How to submit a con-script page.

New scripts appear at the bottom of the page. You can support this site by making a donation, or by contributing in other ways. Book Accommodation, Restaurants and Flights on Booking. Alphabets, or phonemic alphabets, are sets of letters, usually arranged in a fixed order, each of which represents one or more phonemes, both consonants and vowels, in the language they are used to write.

In some case combinations of letters are used to represent single phonemes, as in the English sh, ch and th. The Greeks created the first phonemic alphabet when they adapted the Phoenican alphabet to write Greek. They used a number of Phoenician letters that represented consonant sounds not present in Greek to write Greek vowels. The names of the Greek letters were based on Phoenican letter names. The best-known and most widely-used alphabets are the Latin or Roman alphabet and the Cyrillic alphabet, which have been adapted to write numerous languages. Most other alphabets are used for a single language or just a few languages.

The IPA transcriptions are the letters and other symbols which appear in square bracketts, like this , . You can support this site by making a donation, or by contributing in other ways. Book Accommodation, Restaurants and Flights on Booking. This article is about the modern writing system and its history. For an overview of the entire language, see Japanese language.

When written vertically, the writing system is top to bottom, and right to left. When written horizontally, the writing system is most often left to right, similar to standard English text. This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA. The modern Japanese writing system uses a combination of logographic kanji, which are adopted Chinese characters, and syllabic kana.

Several thousand kanji characters are in regular use. Japanese primary and secondary school students are required to learn 2,136 jōyō kanji as of 2010. In modern Japanese, the hiragana and katakana syllabaries each contain 46 basic characters, or 71 including diacritics. Although rare, there are some words that use all three scripts in the same word.

Certain names may be written in hiragana or katakana, or some combination of these and kanji. Unusual or nonstandard readings may be glossed using furigana. Kanji compounds are sometimes given arbitrary readings for stylistic purposes. English prepositions such as “in”, “to”, “from”, “by” and “for”. Furigana may aid children or nonnative speakers or clarify nonstandard, rare, or ambiguous readings, especially for words that use kanji not part of the jōyō kanji list.