Children learn best through play

Please forward this error screen to 95. In children learn best through play section you can listen to fun chants to hear how we use grammar.

You can also play games and print activities to help you understand. Have fun saying tongue twisters in English. Saying tongue twisters can be difficult at first, so don’t worry if you can’t do it very well to begin with. Just keep practising and have fun! In this section there are lots of flashcards for you to print. Play flashcards games to help you remember new words. There are also some flashcards for you to colour and write!

We have lots of great colouring pages for you to have fun practising English vocabulary. There are pictures for many different topics including people, places and different times of the year. Download and print, then read and colour. In this section there are craft activities for you to print. Try and speak in English while you are making them. We have lots of free online games, songs, stories and activities for children. Make your own comic strip and send it to your friends.

Listen to a song about what these amazing superheroes can do. How do you celebrate your birthday? What’s the best birthday present you have ever got? What do you do at birthday parties? Watch this story, one of our ‘British tales’ videos about characters and people from British history, to find out! Do you have a good memory?

Watch the video to find out how to improve your memory. Play a word game to learn and practise places to live vocabulary. My favourite ‘y’ word is dragonfly. I know lots of ‘y’ words such as sandy, rocky, sweety and so one. But sometimes my sister takes a part in foodraising in our school. Courses Find a face-to-face or online course near you. What’s your favourite way to be healthy?

The United Kingdom’s international organisation for cultural relations and educational opportunities. Read a roundtable with its founders here, or see new stories in the Human Interest section. New research shows that teaching kids more and more, at ever-younger ages, may backfire. Ours is an age of pedagogy. Anxious parents instruct their children more and more, at younger and younger ages, until they’re reading books to babies in the womb.

They pressure teachers to make kindergartens and nurseries more like schools. So does the law—the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act explicitly urged more direct instruction in federally funded preschools. There are skeptics, of course, including some parents, many preschool teachers, and even a few policy-makers. Shouldn’t very young children be allowed to explore, inquire, play, and discover, they ask? Perhaps direct instruction can help children learn specific facts and skills, but what about curiosity and creativity—abilities that are even more important for learning in the long run? What do we already know about how teaching affects learning? Not as much as we would like, unfortunately, because it is a very difficult thing to study.