Countries with separate training of boys and girls

The reports were shared at the World Health Assembly. 6-7 November 2014 – Close to 100 high level representatives from governments, civil society, and international organizations have gathered in Geneva for two days to reaffirm their commitment to accelerating progress towards women’s and children’s health in the lead countries with separate training of boys and girls to and in the post-2015 era, and to discuss how to ensure that accountability remains at the centre of this agenda.

Governments of Canada and Norway, is the last one of a number of high- level meetings convened by various key partners in 2014, all part of a larger strategic process aimed at bringing together stakeholders in women’s and children’s health to keep the momentum going and set the agenda as we approach the MDGs. MDGs 4 and 5, aimed at reducing child and maternal deaths and improving maternal health, are lagging behind. We should judge the progress in humanity and the progress of any society or country by the way they treat their women and children. They have been lagging behind in the last 20 to 30 years of development. We should give them special attention. Dr Flavia Bustreo about the need to further accelerate progress. Country assessments and roadmaps for accountability for health.

Assessments drafted during accountability workshops, based on the Country Accountability Framework assessment and planning tool, and roadmaps reviewed and validated through a broad consultation with the major stakeholders in-country. Today more girls than ever go to school. However, despite progress, women and girls continue to face multiple barriers based on gender and its intersections with other factors, such as age, ethnicity, poverty, and disability, in the equal enjoyment of the right to quality education. The international community has recognised the equal right to quality education of everyone and committed to achieving gender equality in all fields, including education, through their acceptance of international human rights law.

This means that states have legal obligations to remove all discriminatory barriers, whether they exist in law or in everyday life, and to undertake positive measures to bring about equality, including in access of, within, and through education. Where out-of-school rates are higher, the gender gap tends to be wider. From a global perspective, as the level of education increases, girls tend to fare slightly better in terms of participation. These statistics, however, mask disparities at the regional and country level. Young women are also more likely to be excluded from upper secondary education in the Caucasus and Central Asia, Northern Africa, Southern Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and Western Asia.

758 million illiterate adults are women. Despite gains in rates of girls’ enrolment in primary school there are disparities in completion rates. At current rates, the poorest boys in sub-Saharan Africa will achieve universal primary completion in 2069, but this will take nearly 20 years longer for the poorest girls. Many countries that demonstrate higher retention rates at the primary levels are failing to transfer these gains toward transitioning of girls to the secondary level. For example, in Tanzania, near universal enrollment for girls at the primary level has been achieved with a retention rate of 89.