Drawing school for children from 3

The Lancashire Grid for Learning provides a variety of educational resources, content and managed services to support schools in maximising the benefits of technology to support teaching and learning. If you have any feedback regarding our resources, content drawing school for children from 3 services, please contact us. CURRICULUM Links, resources and support for curriculum areas.

PRIMARY ENGLISH Information, projects and resources to support Primary English. PRIMARY MATHEMATICS Information and resources to support Primary Mathematics. PROJECTS AND INITIATIVES Information of local and nationally run projects and initiatives. SECONDARY Information, projects and resources to support Secondary subjects. LPDS NATIONAL CURRICULUM SUPPORT MATERIALS Resources for developing a whole school curriculum. SHARING GOOD PRACTICE Information about the LPDS Award. Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot.

Please forward this error screen to sharedip-10718040103. Not to be confused with Curriculum vitae. A curriculum for the MD degree. The term often refers specifically to a planned sequence of instruction, or to a view of the student’s experiences in terms of the educator’s or school’s instructional goals. Curricula may be tightly standardized, or may include a high level of instructor or learner autonomy. UNESCO’s International Bureau of Education has the primary mission of studying curricula and their implementation worldwide. First published use of “curriculum” in 1576.

By the seventeenth century, the University of Glasgow also referred to its “course” of study as a “curriculum”, producing the first known use of the term in English in 1633. Consider splitting it into new pages, adding subheadings, or condensing it. There is no generally agreed upon definition of curriculum. Kerr defines curriculum as, “All the learning which is planned and guided by the school, whether it is carried on in groups or individually, inside or outside of school.

Braslavsky states that curriculum is an agreement among communities, educational professionals, and the State on what learners should take on during specific periods of their lives. Furthermore, the curriculum defines “why, what, when, where, how, and with whom to learn. Outlines the skills, performances, attitudes, and values pupils are expected to learn from schooling. It includes statements of desired pupil outcomes, descriptions of materials, and the planned sequence that will be used to help pupils attain the outcomes. The total learning experience provided by a school. The aggregate of courses of study given in a learning environment.

The courses are arranged in a sequence to make learning a subject easier. In schools, a curriculum spans several grades. Curriculum can refer to the entire program provided by a classroom, school, district, state, or country. A classroom is assigned sections of the curriculum as defined by the school. Explicit curriculum: subjects that will be taught, the identified “mission” of the school, and the knowledge and skills that the school expects successful students to acquire. Implicit curriculum: lessons that arise from the culture of the school and the behaviors, attitudes, and expectations that characterize that culture, the unintended curriculum.

The term itself is attributed to Philip W. Jackson and is not always meant to be a negative. Hidden curriculum, if its potential is realized, could benefit students and learners in all educational systems. Excluded curriculum: topics or perspectives that are specifically excluded from the curriculum. Extracurricular: May include school-sponsored programs, which are intended to supplement the academic aspect of the school experience, or community-based programs and activities. Examples of school-sponsored extracurricular programs include sports, academic clubs, and performing arts.