Factors affecting parenting

The examples and perspective in this article deal primarily with the United States and Canada and do not represent factors affecting parenting worldwide view of the subject. If a man wish to separate from a woman who has borne him children, or from his wife who has borne him children: then he shall give that wife her dowry, and a part of the usufruct of field, garden, and property, so that she can rear her children. When she has brought up her children, a portion of all that is given to the children, equal as that of one son, shall be given to her. She may then marry the man of her heart.

The modern concept of alimony is derived from English ecclesiastical courts that awarded alimony in cases of separation and divorce. Alimony pendente lite was given until the divorce decree, based on the husband’s duty to support the wife during a marriage that still continued. Liberalization of divorce laws occurred in the 19th century, but divorce was only possible in cases of marital misconduct. As a result, the requirement to pay alimony became linked to the concept of fault in the divorce. Alimony to wives was paid because it was assumed that the marriage, and the wife’s right to support, would have continued but for the misbehavior of the husband. In the 1970s, the United States Supreme Court ruled against gender bias in alimony awards and, according to the U.

Census Bureau, the percentage of alimony recipients who are male rose from 2. Once dissolution proceedings commence, either party may seek interim or pendente lite support during the course of the litigation. It is not an absolute right, but may be granted, the amount and terms varying with the circumstances. Unless the parties agree on the terms of their divorce in a binding written instrument, the court will make a determination based on the legal argument and the testimony submitted by both parties. This can be modified at any future date based on a change of circumstances by either party on proper notice to the other party and application to the court.

Alimony is not child support, where, after divorce, one parent is required to contribute to the support of their children by paying money to the child’s other parent or guardian. Child support is considered a payment that a parent is making for the support of their offspring, and the parent who pays it pays the taxes. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 has changed the federal tax treatment of alimony for divorces and separation agreements signed on or after January 1, 2019, making it identical to that for child support—non-deductible for the payer, and non-taxable for the recipient. One who allows his or her alimony obligations to go into arrears, where there is an ability to pay, may be found in contempt of court and be sent to jail. Alimony obligations are not discharged as a result of the obligee filing bankruptcy.