French children fb2

Breastfeeding all babies for the first 2 years would save the lives of more than 820 000 children under french children fb2 5 annually. WHO and UNICEF today issued new 10-step guidance to increase support for breastfeeding in health facilities that provide maternity and newborn services. The operational guidance is intended to contribute to harmonized reporting by Member States on the GNMF indicators. 2 November 2017 — The Global Nutrition Summit in Milan on November 4th, 2017, will take stock of commitments made to date, celebrate progress toward global goals on nutrition, and announce new commitments to accelerate the global response to malnutrition.

3 of people suffer from as a result of malnutrition: wasting, stunting, vitamin and mineral deficiency, overweight or obesity and diet-related non-communicable disease. As part of its response to the global epidemic of obesity, WHO is today releasing guidelines to support primary healthcare workers identify and help children who are overweight or obese. In 2016 an estimated 41 million children under 5 were affected by overweight or obesity. Four species of intestinal worms affect almost a quarter of the world’s poorest and mostly marginalized people. They disrupt people’s ability to absorb nutrients, and impede the growth and physical development of millions of children. Periodic deworming programmes with a single-tablet treatment can drastically reduce the suffering of those infected and protect the 1. 5 billion people currently estimated to be at risk.

The smaller children lie tangled beside her, their chests rising and falling under winter coats and wool blankets. A few feet away, their mother and father sleep near the mop bucket they use as a toilet. Two other children share a mattress by the rotting wall where the mice live, opposite the baby, whose crib is warmed by a hair dryer perched on a milk crate. Slipping out from her covers, the oldest girl sits at the window. On mornings like this, she can see all the way across Brooklyn to the Empire State Building, the first New York skyscraper to reach 100 floors. Her gaze always stops at that iconic temple of stone, its tip pointed celestially, its facade lit with promise. 11-year-old girl, never one for patience.

This child of New York is always running before she walks. She likes being first — the first to be born, the first to go to school, the first to make the honor roll. Even her name, Dasani, speaks of a certain reach. The bottled water had come to Brooklyn’s bodegas just before she was born, catching the fancy of her mother, who could not afford such indulgences. It hinted at a different, upwardly mobile clientele, a set of newcomers who over the next decade would transform the borough. Dasani’s own neighborhood, Fort Greene, is now one of gentrification’s gems. Her family lives in the Auburn Family Residence, a decrepit city-run shelter for the homeless.

It is a place where mold creeps up walls and roaches swarm, where feces and vomit plug communal toilets, where sexual predators have roamed and small children stand guard for their single mothers outside filthy showers. It is no place for children. Yet Dasani is among 280 children at the shelter. Beyond its walls, she belongs to a vast and invisible tribe of more than 22,000 homeless children in New York, the highest number since the Great Depression, in the most unequal metropolis in America. Nearly a quarter of Dasani’s childhood has unfolded at Auburn, where she shares a 520-square-foot room with her parents and seven siblings. As they begin to stir on this frigid January day, Dasani sets about her chores. Her mornings begin with Baby Lele, whom she changes, dresses and feeds, checking that the formula distributed by the shelter is not, once again, expired.