German alphabet for children

This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its german alphabet for children remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Over the history of its use into the first part of the 20th century, many individual letters acquired variant forms. English cursive, in parallel: location, contents and context of the text determined which script style to use.

It was developed in 1911 and taught in German schools as primary script from 1935 until the beginning of January 1941. Final paragraph of a German contract from 1750 signed by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover. Wikimedia Commons has media related to German Kurrent. This page was last edited on 1 April 2018, at 15:37. This article is about sets of letters used in written languages. The Proto-Canaanite script, later known as the Phoenician alphabet, is the first fully phonemic script.

Thus the Phoenician alphabet is considered to be the first alphabet. Many languages use modified forms of the Latin alphabet, with additional letters formed using diacritical marks. Alphabets are usually associated with a standard ordering of letters. This makes them useful for purposes of collation, specifically by allowing words to be sorted in alphabetical order. Knowing one’s ABCs”, in general, can be used as a metaphor for knowing the basics about anything.

The history of the alphabet started in ancient Egypt. In the Middle Bronze Age, an apparently “alphabetic” system known as the Proto-Sinaitic script appears in Egyptian turquoise mines in the Sinai peninsula dated to circa the 15th century BC, apparently left by Canaanite workers. The Proto-Sinaitic script eventually developed into the Phoenician alphabet, which is conventionally called “Proto-Canaanite” before ca. The oldest text in Phoenician script is an inscription on the sarcophagus of King Ahiram.