History of letter t

Alternatively, below are the most popular. In 1864, after 32 long years in the service of his master, Jourdon Anderson and his wife, Amanda, escaped a life of slavery when Union Army soldiers freed them from the plantation on which they had been working so tirelessly. They grasped the opportunity with vigour, quickly moved to Ohio where Jourdon could find paid work with which to support his growing family, and didn’t look back. Jourdon’s reply to the person history of letter t enslaved his family, dictated from his home on August 7th, is everything you could wish for, and quite rightly was subsequently reprinted in numerous newspapers.

Jourdon Anderson never returned to Big Spring, Tennessee. He passed away in 1907, aged 81, and is buried alongside his wife who died six years later. Together they had a total of eleven children. This letter, along with 124 other fascinating pieces of correspondence, can be found in the bestselling book, Letters of Note. Image: A group of escaped slaves in Virginia in 1862, courtesy of the Library of Congress. To My Old Master, Colonel P. Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can.

I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well.

The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls.