Moral education of children and youth

Please change your browser settings or upgrade your browser. Please change your browser settings or upgrade moral education of children and youth browser. Please forward this error screen to sharedip-16662639. Statutory guidance for local authorities to support looked-after and previously looked-after children’s aspirations to achieve in further and higher education.

It details the duty local authorities and VSHs have to promote the educational achievement of the children they look after. Statutory guidance sets out what local authorities must do to comply with the law. You should follow the guidance unless you have a very good reason not to. 26 February 2018 Updated with latest statutory guidance. Is there anything wrong with this page? All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.

For the novel by André Gide, see The Immoralist. Immanuel Kant introduced the categorical imperative: “Act only according to that maxim whereby you can, at the same time, will that it should become a universal law”. The word “ethics” is “commonly used interchangeably with ‘morality,’ and sometimes it is used more narrowly to mean the moral principles of a particular tradition, group, or individual. This section does not cite any sources. In its descriptive sense, “morality” refers to personal or cultural values, codes of conduct or social mores from a society that provides these codes of conduct in which it applies and is accepted by an individual. Normative ethics is the branch of philosophy which studies morality in this sense.

Moral realism is the class of theories which hold that there are true moral statements that report objective moral facts. Moral anti-realism, on the other hand, holds that moral statements either fail or do not even attempt to report objective moral facts. Some forms of non-cognitivism and ethical subjectivism, while considered anti-realist in the robust sense used here, are considered realist in the sense synonymous with moral universalism. Celia Green made a distinction between tribal and territorial morality. She characterizes the latter as predominantly negative and proscriptive: it defines a person’s territory, including his or her property and dependents, which is not to be damaged or interfered with. Peterson and Seligman approach the anthropological view looking across cultures, geo-cultural areas and across millennia. They conclude that certain virtues have prevailed in all cultures they examined.

Fons Trompenaars, author of Did the Pedestrian Die? One of these was whether the driver of a car would have his friend, a passenger riding in the car, lie in order to protect the driver from the consequences of driving too fast and hitting a pedestrian. This section contains content that is written like an advertisement. John Newton, author of Complete Conduct Principles for the 21st Century compared the Eastern and the Western cultures about morality.

The development of modern morality is a process closely tied to sociocultural evolution. On this understanding, moralities are sets of self-perpetuating and biologically-driven behaviors which encourage human cooperation. Biologists contend that all social animals, from ants to elephants, have modified their behaviors, by restraining immediate selfishness in order to improve their evolutionary fitness. The phenomenon of reciprocity in nature is seen by evolutionary biologists as one way to begin to understand human morality. Its function is typically to ensure a reliable supply of essential resources, especially for animals living in a habitat where food quantity or quality fluctuates unpredictably. They define morality as “a suite of interrelated other-regarding behaviors that cultivate and regulate complex interactions within social groups.

This suite of behaviors includes empathy, reciprocity, altruism, cooperation, and a sense of fairness. The brain areas that are consistently involved when humans reason about moral issues have been investigated by a quantitative large-scale meta-analysis of the brain activity changes reported in the moral neuroscience literature. Stimulation of the VMPC by transcranial magnetic stimulation, has been shown to inhibit the ability of human subjects to take into account intent when forming a moral judgment. According to this investigation, TMS did not disrupt participants’ ability to make any moral judgment.