Pedagogical development of the child

Please forward this error screen to 185. Anne has been an independent trainer for twenty years. She supplies courses and in-service training for national and regional bodies, local authorities, pre-schools, schools, museums and other organisations throughout Britain and internationally. What’s wrong with Pedagogical development of the child’s Bold Beginnings report?

Please forward this error screen to 216. 30-cents stamp of the USA figuring American philosopher John Dewey, issued 21 October 1968. Sourced from Wikimedia Commons and believed to be in the public domain. This process begins unconsciously almost at birth, and is continually shaping the individual’s powers, saturating his consciousness, forming his habits, training his ideas, and arousing his feelings and emotions. I believe that the only true education comes through the stimulation of the child’s powers by the demands of the social situations in which he finds himself. Through these demands he is stimulated to act as a member of a unity, to emerge from his original narrowness of action and feeling, and to conceive of himself from the standpoint of the welfare of the group to which he belongs. Through the responses which others make to his own activities he comes to know what these mean in social terms.

Of these two sides, the psychological is the basis. The child’s own instincts and powers furnish the material and give the starting point for all education. I believe that knowledge of social conditions, of the present state of civilization, is necessary in order properly to interpret the child’s powers. The child has his own instincts and tendencies, but we do not know what these mean until we can translate them into their social equivalents. We must be able to carry them back into a social past and see them as the inheritance of previous race activities.

I believe that the psychological and social sides are organically related and that education cannot be regarded as a compromise between the two, or a superimposition of one upon the other. I believe that each of these objections is true when urged against one side isolated from the other. But, on the other hand, the only possible adjustment which we can give to the child under existing conditions, is that which arises through putting him in complete possession of all his powers. In sum, I believe that the individual who is to be educated is a social individual and that society is an organic union of individuals. Education, therefore, must begin with a psychological insight into the child’s capacities, interests, and habits. What the School Is I believe that the school is primarily a social institution. Education being a social process, the school is simply that form of community life in which all those agencies are concentrated that will be most effective in bringing the child to share in the inherited resources of the race, and to use his own powers for social ends.