Requirements to level of preparation of preschool children

Montessori’requirements to level of preparation of preschool children methods had traveled all over the world and she had even certified teacher trainers to train teachers. But because there were was no oversight in these first training centers, the courses were shortened and the miracles that had been discovered in the Casa dei Bambini were no longer occurring.

Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel. The schedule: “The Three-hour Work Period”. 3-hour, uninterrupted, work period each day not interrupted by group activity. The “3-hour Work Period” is vital to the success of Montessori education and often misunderstood. It means that children have three hours to choose and carry out their own work. There is constant interaction, problem solving, child to child teaching, and socialization.

Children are challenged according to their ability and never bored. Work centers: The environment is arranged according to subject area, and children are always free to move around the room instead of staying at desks. There is no limit to how long a child can work with a piece of material. At any one time in a day all subjects — math, language, science, history, geography, art, music, etc. Teaching method: “Teach by teaching, not by correcting”. There are no papers turned back with red marks and corrections.

Instead the child’s effort and work is respected as it is. The teacher, through extensive observation and record-keeping, plans individual projects to¬†enable each child to learn what he needs in order to improve. Rather than lecturing to large or small groups of children, the teacher is trained to teach one child at a time, and to oversee thirty or more children working on a broad array of tasks. Basic lessons: The Montessori teacher spends a lot of time during teacher training practicing the many lessons with materials in all areas. She must pass a written and oral exam on these lessons in order to be certified. She is trained to recognize a child’s readiness according to age, ability, and interest in a specific lesson, and is prepared to guide individual progress. Areas of study: All subjects are interwoven, not taught in isolation, the teacher modeling a “Renaissance” person of broad interests for the children.

A child can work on any material he understands at any time. This is possible because the children stay in the same group for three to six years and much of the teaching comes from the children and the environment. This particular model is backed up by Harvard psychologist Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences. Assessment: There are no grades, or other forms of reward or punishment, subtle or overt. Assessment is by portfolio and the teacher’s observation and record keeping.

The test of whether or not the system is working lies in the accomplishment and behavior of the children, their happiness, maturity, kindness, and love of learning and level of work. Requirements for age 0-6: There are no academic requirements for this age, but children are exposed to amazing amounts of knowledge and often learn to read, write and calculate beyond what is usually thought interesting to a child of this age. Requirements for ages 6-18: The teacher remains alert to the interests of each child and facilitates individual research in following interests. There are no curriculum requirements except those set by the state, or college entrance requirements, for specific grade levels.

These take a minimum amount of time. Character education: Education of character is considered equally with academic education, children learning to take care of themselves, their environment, each other – cooking, cleaning, building, gardening, moving gracefully, speaking politely, being considerate and helpful, doing social work in the community, etc. You may use anything from this site for educational purposes, including academic papers, citing “with permission of The International Montessori Index, www. The portable version of the defibrillator was invented in the mid-1960s by Frank Pantridge in Belfast, Northern Ireland. A diagram showing the chain of survival.

An automated external defibrillator is used in cases of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias which lead to sudden cardiac arrest, which is not the same as a heart attack. In each of these two types of shockable cardiac arrhythmia, the heart is electrically active, but in a dysfunctional pattern that does not allow it to pump and circulate blood. In ventricular tachycardia, the heart beats too fast to effectively pump blood. Ultimately, ventricular tachycardia leads to ventricular fibrillation. The asystolic patient only has a chance of survival if, through a combination of CPR and cardiac stimulant drugs, one of the shockable rhythms can be established, which makes it imperative for CPR to be carried out prior to the arrival of a defibrillator.

AEDs are designed to be used by laypersons who ideally should have received AED training. However, sixth-grade students have been reported to begin defibrillation within 90 seconds, as opposed to a trained operator beginning within 67 seconds. Bras with a metal underwire and piercings on the torso must be removed before using the AED on someone to avoid interference. In a study analyzing the effects of having AEDs immediately present during Chicago’s Heart Start program over a two-year period, of 22 individuals, 18 were in a cardiac arrhythmia which AEDs can treat.