School uniform items

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This article needs additional citations for verification. The Japanese school uniform is modeled in appearance similar to that of the European-style naval uniforms and was first used in Japan in the late 19th century, replacing the traditional kimono. Today, school uniforms are common in many of the Japanese public and private school systems. The gakuran and sailor-style dress have always been a part of Japan’s “growing modern” culture due to it appearing formal and has existed as a concept.

Japanese took the idea from scaled down sailor suits worn by children of royal European families. The official said “In Japan, they were probably seen as adorable Western-style children’s outfits, rather than navy gear. In the 1980s sukeban gangs began modifying uniforms by making skirts longer and shortening the tops, and so schools began switching to blazer or sweater vest style uniforms to try to combat the effect. The Asahi Shimbun stated in 2012 that “The sailor suit is changing from adorable and cute, a look that ‘appeals to the boys,’ to a uniform that ‘girls like to wear for themselves.

As of that year, contemporary sailor suits have front closures with zippers or snaps and more constructed bodices. In all schools, Japanese students are required to take off the shoes they wear outdoors and put on their uwabaki, a kind of soft slipper meant to be used only indoors. The Japanese junior and senior-high-school uniform traditionally consists of a military-styled uniform for boys and a sailor outfit for girls. These uniforms are based on Meiji era formal military dress, themselves modeled on European-style naval uniforms. Since some schools do not have sex-segregated changing- or locker-rooms, students may change for sporting activities in their classrooms. As a result, such students may wear their sports uniforms under their classroom uniforms.

It is normal for uniforms to be worn outside of school areas, however this is going out of fashion and many students wear a casual dress. While not many public elementary schools in Japan require uniforms, many private schools and public schools run by the central government still do so. Museum exhibit of the uniforms of the Ichikawa Gakuen school. The middle mannequin is displaying a gakuran. The color is normally black, but some schools use navy blue.

The top has a standing collar buttoning down from top-to-bottom. Buttons are usually decorated with the school emblem to show respect to the school. Pants are straight leg and a black or dark-colored belt is worn with them. Boys usually wear penny loafers or sneakers with this uniform. The second button from the top of a male’s uniform is often given away to a female he is in love with, and is considered a way of confession.

The second button is the one closest to the heart and is said to contain the emotions from all three years attendance at the school. This practice was apparently made popular by a scene in a novel by Taijun Takeda. The gakuran is derived from Prussian cadet uniforms. It was modeled after the uniform used by the British Royal Navy at the time, which Lee had experienced as an exchange student in the United Kingdom.