Teaching learning materials for kids

The Library of Congress offers classroom teaching learning materials for kids and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library’s vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations. World War I: What Are We Fighting For Over There?

Discover and discuss ways to bring the power of Library of Congress primary sources into the classroom. Subscribe to the blog via e-mail or RSS. Using Primary Sources Discover quick and easy ways to begin using primary sources in your classroom, with teachers’ guides, information on citing sources and copyright, and the Library’s primary source analysis tool. TPS Partners The Teaching with Primary Sources Program builds partnerships with educational organizations to support effective instruction using primary sources. TPS partners deliver Library of Congress professional development locally.

The Teaching with Primary Sources Journal The TPS Journal is an online publication created by the Library of Congress Educational Outreach Division in collaboration with the TPS Educational Consortium. Civics Interactives Projects from Congress, Civic Participation, and Primary Sources partners explore history, government, and civic life using Library of Congress primary sources. Is it ever OK to lie in a job interview? So you want to be a teacher? It has only been since the 1980s that this area has attracted more interest among EFL teachers.

The purpose of this article is to look at some of the issues and ways in which literature can be exploited in the classroom. First of all, any method or approach towards using literature in the classroom must take as a starting point the question: What is literature? Many authors, critics and linguists have puzzled over what literature is. One broader explanation of literature says that literary texts are products that reflect different aspects of society.

Before doing any study of a literary text with your learners, one idea would be to ask them what they think literature is. There are many good reasons for using literature in the classroom. It is good to expose learners to this source of unmodified language in the classroom because they skills they acquire in dealing with difficult or unknown language can be used outside the class. Literary texts are often rich is multiple layers of meaning, and can be effectively mined for discussions and sharing feelings or opinions.