The basics of cognitive development of preschool children

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Our Privacy Policy is available for your review. Have you ever wondered why most early childhood programs teach children their colors and shapes early in the year? It’s because color and shape are two very noticeable attributes of the world around us. These first teachings in preschool and kindergarten are basics that your child needs to know before she learns the “other basics” of reading, writing, and math. Understanding color and shape is a tool for learning many skills in all curriculum areas, from math and science to language and reading. When your child plays, he uses sorting and classifying skills as he observes similarities and differences of color and shape, makes comparisons, and organizes this information into piles.

You have probably heard the pride in your child’s voice as she names the colors of the balloons at the store checkout, or her delight when she realizes that a banana and pear are different shades of yellow. But there is much more to your child’s understanding of color than “knowing his colors. While it is important for him to know the names of the colors, it is just as important for him to know what to do with them. You can help by inviting him to notice many shades, hues, and tints. Make up names for these colors together, such as lemon yellow or apple red. You will be helping him use color as a means for creative thinking and language. Introduce your child to the world of shades and hues by giving her some paint swatches to explore.

She can sort them into different color piles, match similar colors, and create a sequence or “color train” of hues from light to dark. Bring out the glue stick and she can cut and paste the colors to make monochromatic collages of yellows, reds, blues, etc. Find more games and activities about color. We all use shape as a way of identifying and organizing visual information. Very early, your child begins to make a connection between familiar objects and their shapes.