The development of children through

Lead in the body is distributed to the brain, liver, kidney and bones. It is stored in the teeth and bones, where it accumulates over time. Human exposure is usually assessed through the measurement of lead in blood. Lead in bone the development of children through released into blood during pregnancy and becomes a source of exposure to the developing fetus.

There is no known level of lead exposure that is considered safe. Lead is a naturally occurring toxic metal found in the Earth’s crust. Its widespread use has resulted in extensive environmental contamination, human exposure and significant public health problems in many parts of the world. Important sources of environmental contamination include mining, smelting, manufacturing and recycling activities, and, in some countries, the continued use of leaded paint, leaded gasoline, and leaded aviation fuel. More than three quarters of global lead consumption is for the manufacture of lead-acid batteries for motor vehicles. Young children are particularly vulnerable to the toxic effects of lead and can suffer profound and permanent adverse health effects, particularly affecting the development of the brain and nervous system. Lead also causes long-term harm in adults, including increased risk of high blood pressure and kidney damage.

Exposure of pregnant women to high levels of lead can cause miscarriage, stillbirth, premature birth and low birth weight, as well as minor malformations. The use of some traditional cosmetics and medicines can also result in lead exposure. 5 times as much ingested lead as adults from a given source. Moreover, children’s innate curiosity and their age-appropriate hand-to-mouth behaviour result in their mouthing and swallowing lead-containing or lead-coated objects, such as contaminated soil or dust and flakes from decaying lead-containing paint. Once lead enters the body, it is distributed to organs such as the brain, kidneys, liver and bones. The body stores lead in the teeth and bones where it accumulates over time. Lead stored in bone may be remobilized into the blood during pregnancy, thus exposing the fetus.

Undernourished children are more susceptible to lead because their bodies absorb more lead if other nutrients, such as calcium, are lacking. At high levels of exposure, lead attacks the brain and central nervous system to cause coma, convulsions and even death. Children who survive severe lead poisoning may be left with mental retardation and behavioural disorders. There is no known safe blood lead concentration. But it is known that, as lead exposure increases, the range and severity of symptoms and effects also increases. Encouragingly, the successful phasing out of leaded gasoline in most countries, together with other lead control measures, has resulted in a significant decline in population-level blood lead concentrations. 2015 data, lead exposure accounted for 494 550 deaths and loss of 9.

The highest burden is in low- and middle-income countries. IHME also estimated that lead exposure accounted for 12. WHO has made available through its website a range of information on lead, including information for policy makers, technical guidance and advocacy materials. WHO is currently developing guidelines on the prevention and management of lead poisoning, which will provide policy-makers, public health authorities and health professionals with evidence-based guidance on the measures that they can take to protect the health of children and adults from lead exposure. Since leaded paint is a continuing source of exposure in many countries, WHO has joined with United Nations Environment Programme to form the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lead Paint.

This is a cooperative initiative to focus and catalyse efforts to achieve international goals to prevent children’s exposure to lead from leaded paints and to minimize occupational exposures to such paint. The elimination of lead paint will contribute to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal target 3. Leaded Petrol Phase-out: Global Status as at March 2017. Swiss psychologist and epistemologist known for his pioneering work in child development. Piaget’s theory of cognitive development and epistemological view are together called “genetic epistemology”. Piaget placed great importance on the education of children.

As the Director of the International Bureau of Education, he declared in 1934 that “only education is capable of saving our societies from possible collapse, whether violent, or gradual. His theory of child development is studied in pre-service education programs. Piaget created the International Center for Genetic Epistemology in Geneva in 1955 while on the faculty of the University of Geneva and directed the Center until his death in 1980. According to Ernst von Glasersfeld, Jean Piaget was “the great pioneer of the constructivist theory of knowing. However, his ideas did not become widely popularized until the 1960s.

Piaget was born in 1896 in Neuchâtel, in the Francophone region of Switzerland. He developed an interest in epistemology due to his godfather’s urgings to study the fields of philosophy and logic. He was educated at the University of Neuchâtel, and studied briefly at the University of Zürich. From 1925 to 1929, Piaget worked as a professor of psychology, sociology, and the philosophy of science at the University of Neuchatel. In 1979 he was awarded the Balzan Prize for Social and Political Sciences. This was as per his request.

The resulting theoretical frameworks are sufficiently different from each other that they have been characterized as representing different “Piagets. More recently, Jeremy Burman responded to Beilin and called for the addition of a phase before his turn to psychology: “the zeroeth Piaget. Before Piaget became a psychologist, he trained in natural history and philosophy. He received a doctorate in 1918 from the University of Neuchatel.