The development of mental functions in preschool age

Please forward this error screen to 172. Browsers that can not handle javascript will not be able to access some features of this site. The Office of Great Start has been charged with ensuring that all children birth to age eight, especially those in highest need, have access to high-quality early learning and development programs and enter kindergarten prepared for success. Children prepared to succeed in fourth grade and beyond by reading proficiently by the end of the development of mental functions in preschool age grade.

In 2013, the Office of Great Start engaged stakeholders across the state in development of Great Start, Great Investment, Great Future: The Plan for Early Learning and Development in Michigan. This comprehensive plan contains six recommendations and numerous priority action items for advancing early learning and development. In late 2015 and early 2016, the Office of Great Start partnered with Public Sector Consultants to gather input on the state of child care in Michigan. The State Board of Education approved the Michigan Core Knowledge and Core Competencies for the Early Care and Education Workforce at their November 2014 meeting. Standards of Quality listed here are the most up-to-date versions available.

If you are a parent interested in learning more, see the Great Start Readiness Program brochure or use this map to find a program in your area. Great Start to Quality helps parents find the best child care and preschool settings for their children and helps providers and educators improve the care they give to children. Transition to Kindergarten Parent Guides address many of the questions that parents have as they look forward to their child’s Kindergarten years. The Office of Great Start offered six learning community webinars. Each webinar was focused on a topic of interest to providers and other stakeholders in the early childhood community. Use the links below to view the presentation resources.

The Office of Great Start is now on Facebook! Click on the icon to stay connected. Children become increasingly competent at adult-style thinking during the “tween” years. Around the age of 11 or 12, children learn to think about abstract concepts. They complete what Piaget termed the concrete operational period and enter the formal operation period.

During the formal operations period, which continues into adulthood, children develop logical thought, deductive reasoning abilities, and improved memory and executive function skills. While not all people, and not all cultures, achieve formal operations, children become increasingly competent at adult-style thinking as they advance. Children this age are able to demonstrate abstract thinking. For example, they can understand shades of gray, wrestle with abstract concepts like love or justice, and formulate values based on thinking and analyzing as opposed to only by feeling or experiencing.