The preparation for the birthday child 2 years

Please forward this error screen to 185. The reports were shared at the World Health Assembly. 6-7 November 2014 – Close to 100 high level representatives from governments, civil society, and international organizations have gathered in Geneva for two days to the preparation for the birthday child 2 years their commitment to accelerating progress towards women’s and children’s health in the lead up to and in the post-2015 era, and to discuss how to ensure that accountability remains at the centre of this agenda.

Governments of Canada and Norway, is the last one of a number of high- level meetings convened by various key partners in 2014, all part of a larger strategic process aimed at bringing together stakeholders in women’s and children’s health to keep the momentum going and set the agenda as we approach the MDGs. MDGs 4 and 5, aimed at reducing child and maternal deaths and improving maternal health, are lagging behind. We should judge the progress in humanity and the progress of any society or country by the way they treat their women and children. They have been lagging behind in the last 20 to 30 years of development. We should give them special attention.

Dr Flavia Bustreo about the need to further accelerate progress. Country assessments and roadmaps for accountability for health. Assessments drafted during accountability workshops, based on the Country Accountability Framework assessment and planning tool, and roadmaps reviewed and validated through a broad consultation with the major stakeholders in-country. The smaller children lie tangled beside her, their chests rising and falling under winter coats and wool blankets. A few feet away, their mother and father sleep near the mop bucket they use as a toilet. Two other children share a mattress by the rotting wall where the mice live, opposite the baby, whose crib is warmed by a hair dryer perched on a milk crate.

Slipping out from her covers, the oldest girl sits at the window. On mornings like this, she can see all the way across Brooklyn to the Empire State Building, the first New York skyscraper to reach 100 floors. Her gaze always stops at that iconic temple of stone, its tip pointed celestially, its facade lit with promise. 11-year-old girl, never one for patience. This child of New York is always running before she walks. She likes being first — the first to be born, the first to go to school, the first to make the honor roll. Even her name, Dasani, speaks of a certain reach.

The bottled water had come to Brooklyn’s bodegas just before she was born, catching the fancy of her mother, who could not afford such indulgences. It hinted at a different, upwardly mobile clientele, a set of newcomers who over the next decade would transform the borough. Dasani’s own neighborhood, Fort Greene, is now one of gentrification’s gems. Her family lives in the Auburn Family Residence, a decrepit city-run shelter for the homeless. It is a place where mold creeps up walls and roaches swarm, where feces and vomit plug communal toilets, where sexual predators have roamed and small children stand guard for their single mothers outside filthy showers.