The system of training gifted children

Browsers that can not handle javascript will not be able to access some features the system of training gifted children this site. Gifted and Talented programs were created to help advanced learning students achieve the most out of their educational opportunities. The Department of Education recognizes that children with talents have unique learning styles which require special planning and accommodations by school personnel to recognize, develop and nurture. To help answer questions and administer Advanced and Accelerated programs, each Intermediate School District has its own Consultant.

The associations listed below also have helpful information related to Gifted and Talented education. NAGC staff and leaders support and develop policies and practices that encourage and respond to the diverse expressions of gifts and talents in children and youth from all cultures, racial and ethnic backgrounds, and socioeconomic groups. The NAGC also has compiled a variety of helpful resources for parents, educators, and students. The main approaches to gifted education are enrichment and acceleration. An enrichment program teaches additional, related material, but keeps the student progressing through the curriculum at the same rate. For example, after the gifted students have completed the normal work in the curriculum, an enrichment program might provide them with additional details about a subject in the curriculum. There is no standard global definition of what a gifted student is.

Multiple definitions of giftedness are used by different groups. Most of these definitions select the students who are the most skilled or talented in a given area, e. Gifted and talented education dates back thousands of years. One of the earliest Western studies of human abilities was conducted by Sir Francis Galton, who between 1888 and 1894 developed and compiled measurements of over 7,500 individuals to gauge their natural intellectual abilities. After the war, Terman undertook an extensive longitudinal study of 643 children in California who scored at IQ 140 or above, the Genetic Studies of Genius, continuing to evaluate them throughout their lives.